Roosters five-eighth Luke Keary.

Sydney Roosters playmaker Luke Keary is open to the prospect of being Cooper Cronk's long-term replacement in the No.7 jersey.

Keary has shown enough in last year's grand final victory alongside an injured Cronk and in Saturday night's win over Manly to suggest a permanent switch could work in the 27-year-old's favour when Cronk hangs up the boots.

"I've learned a lot off Cooper for the last 18 months now," Keary said after the side's win.

"I'll spend another six months or a year [learning] if he wants under him. It could only be good. While he's here I'm happy to be his sidekick.

"Once he decides to finish, Robbo will probably sit down and say what way do we want to go.

"Whether he wants to push me into the seven I would be happy to do it, or if he wants to keep me in the six I'm more than happy to do that too.

"I don't really have a preference to be honest."

One thing Keary wants to keep at his disposal is his ability to roam during matches.

The Clive Churchill medallist favoured his usual left side in the eight-point win over the Sea Eagles on Saturday night with three try assists, while the first of four-pointer of the night came on the right edge via a Keary kick.

"I don't see myself as a left or right side player, I like to play both," he said. "Being a number six lets me do that and I was able to do it tonight with Latrell and Teddy.

"I enjoy being able to go anywhere I want. It's hard to explain the system but I just get my rhythm and play off [Cooper] but I'm allowed to take the ball whenever I want it. I've just got to put myself in that position.

"As I get more game fit I'll get more ball."

Roosters coach Trent Robinson believes Keary and teammate James Tedesco hold the key to the club's long-term success.

"Everyone talks about halves but there's a difference between a halfback and a five-eighth and the way they play the game," Robinson said.

"Luke's been an incredible five-eighth for us, the way that he plays and takes all those instinctive players.

"And then Cooper's out and has to switch into that 'I've got to control' and there's a game management sense to him.

"He did both, I thought in the first half he controlled the game and then he had the ability to play his plays as well. The balance between was high class.

"Luke is going to be a dominant player of the future whenever that time comes. Whoever comes in it will still be Luke and Teddy that will h

ave the major roles."